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Taking Care of Yourself With Chronic Illness

Every once in a while, a well-intentioned family member, a friend, or a medical professional will tell me I’m not fighting hard enough, that I’m not taking care of myself, et cetera.
The opposite used to be true – I would receive compliments from my doctors for the presentations I would make each time I came in. One nurse said she could tell I was not succumbing, and complimented me for my strength, saying this was why she wanted to help me.

There’s a few things I want to say here. First, all people with chronic illnesses deserve help and respect, whether you perceive them to be weak or strong. Secondly, when it comes to battles, you win some and you lose some. Wars fluctuate, and health is a journey – it isn’t linear. When I was first diagnosed with fibromyalgia, I was exercising at least an hour a day, every day, sometimes two hours, and had a strict vegan diet. Then winter came with worse symptoms and I was planning a wedding with in-laws I had issues with. My mental health was in the toilet, and as Bruce Lee wisely said, “The body follows the mind.”

My mind worsened as my PTSD triggered and my marriage fell apart before it really even began. Again, the body follows the mind, and I got knocked off of my pursuit of physical health horse in pursuit of improving my mental health and my marriage. Once again reiterating, the body follows the mind.

This is not to give a laundry list of excuses. I merely want to extrapolate a bit that the body and mind are connected, and if the mind suffers, the body usually does too. I’m in more stress than I ever have in my life. My fibromyalgia is kicking it in to high gear.

So yes, I may not be taking as good care of my self physically right now, but I am trying to invest in my mind to get to that point. The only way out of hell is through. A marriage being under the gun takes precedence over buying organic food, especially if you can’t afford it and the two of you are $3k over in medical bills. Could the organic food prevent the medical bills? Possibly. Could a gym membership? Possibly.

This is the crux of it: health being accessible and affordable. Many low income Americans suffer the most from health maladies because they can’t afford preventative care and the care they need from not being able to take care of themselves.

My husband and I aren’t low income, but the two of us on one salary with all of my exorbitant medical bills puts us in a bind.

And I am fighting in other ways – I still stay organized with my symptoms, I’m still productive, and I annoy my doctors if I think something is wrong. I read literature on health subjects. I hope to have a book review or two coming out soon.

Please remember that when people say these things to you, they’re probably trying to be helpful. No one can truly understand anyone else. Take heart.

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